Project FeederWatch Update – Weekend of March 18/19

by Lee Farnham

As Feeder Watch draws to a close on April 7, we continue to see the effects of a coming change in the seasons. This weekend had 20 different species, three fewer than last weekend, but the total number reported was up to 129 from 112 a week ago….yet a year-round resident, the Carolina Wren (a real favorite of ours) was among the missing. We know he’s there because we saw him on Monday after we were finished…it’s a matter of our adjusting to his schedule, not v.v.

Goldfinches again led the hit parade;  if we had seen three more it would’ve given us a new record for the year, 58.  Juncos had a strong weekend with 14; they are mostly seen on our deck, beneath the Thistle feeders for the Goldfinches.  In fact, I’ve seen 16 of them at one time, but last weekend, they were all over:  on the deck, under the suet, around the Sunflower Hearts, and under the Safflower.

Mourning Doves got into bigger numbers (20), but the novelty about reporting 20 is that only six of them were on the ground, under The Safflower. The rest were on branches of our Hemlocks, at the end of our yard, but they can be included in Feeder Watch count because they will drop down to feed.

Transients, like Grackles, Red-Wing Blackbirds and Starlings will taper off quickly, but maybe next week will bring the return of the Carolina Wren, and perhaps a Cedar Waxwing, or Bluebirds, or even a Brown Creeper.  “Creepie’s” not been seen this year, and it isn’t right….he always used to come around 1200 and scoot up (not down) the Sassafras and Dogwoods looking for insects.  If you see him, please ask him to stop by when we’re looking next weekend.

The final total for the weekend was 20 species and 129 total birds. See Observation tallies to date.

Note:  Lee Farnham is an avid birder and a long-time participant in Cornell’s Lab of Ornithology Feeder Watch program in which more than 16,000 citizen scientists from all states and Provinces of Canada report weekly feeder activity from early November to early April.

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